International Dot Day in P1 to P5

There were two texts used on this day by our P1 to P5 learners – the traditional International Dot Day book, “The Dot” written by Peter. H. Reynolds, and one by Loryn Brantz, “Not Just a Dot”.  Both books were used to develop the students’ imagination, creativity and curiosity – all key aspects of our Primary Years Programme. As you read on, you will see how simple picture books offers a wealth of learning in the hands of our skilled teachers and creative students.  

This is the book that started the whole international movement every 15th September. 

So what exactly were the Primary up to on this day? 

How did P1 link their learning to International Dot Day? Learners in P1 took inspiration from The Dot Song by Emily Dale and Peter H. Reynolds and posted a voice comment saying to themselves – “I can do anything, if I try.”  Learners wrote their names using coloured dots using Seesaw’s creative drawing tools, thus linking the development of their tech skills and their creativity. Last week, the theme was also integrated into their mathematics, specifically their number work. Learners made circular cutouts and wrote numbers of their choice on each dot; they organized the cut-outs from small to big.  

Dot’s are important in our lives P2: The P2 learners read a different book, but still about a Dot. They looked at why a dot is important by considering the question: what in our lives is a dot?  They then used Jamboard, a type of interactive whiteboard, to upload their pictures and sentences. Here are some of their observations: 

Ishan: A dot is a full stop. Ishan showed how he connected to a language convention.  

Amira and Marcos, connected it to themselves: A dot is a face and an eye is a dot. 

Siyun: He linked it to transport and how we get around; a dot is a wheel or tyre. We were not surprised as we know Siyun loves cars! 

Arjun: Who is well-known for his love of sports stated, “a dot is a ball or a pool”. 

Ruhi, the young chef, linked her dot to a pizza. 

Sahil and Suhanna linked the dot to our natural world.  A dot is a bird hole or the earth.  

Miraya, said “A dot is coin”, we wonder if this is a sign she will become an economist! 

You can see from their varied responses they used their imagination and drew on some of their experiences, interests and passions. When learners are able to view the dot from different perspectives, it helps develop our thinking skills and the attribute of being open-minded. 

 Insert picture two the book image. 

How did the ELA Team incorporate International Dot DayIn our P4 ELA class we read aloud, during a Google Meet, the book “The Dot”. Our main task was to discuss the book and find out what were the main ideas of the book. All the learners read the book aloud collaboratively. They then reflected on their takeaways from the book. Here are some leaner reflections: 

  • Nothing is impossible. 
  • We learned about drawing.  
  • Even though she was scared she tried, we must try too. 
  • Everything can be Art. 
  • Try your best. 

While reading the book they also discussed how Vashti, the main character, was open-minded when she drew the dot, how she was an inquirer as she made more dots of different kinds and how she was caring when she tried to help the boy to draw too. We therefore were able to link attributes of the learner profile to our language work.  

How is it extended in P5? Read and Reflect was the order of the day in P5. The students read the story, reflected on how it connected to their experiences and then answered a series of reflection questions: 

Reflection: The Dot Andrea  

Has there ever been a time when you thought that you couldn’t do something?  

Yes, there was when I thought I couldn’t draw my dog but it came out quite good.  

How did you overcome it? By motivating myself and looking at my dog a lot.  

How can you help others when they don’t believe that they can do something?  

Inspire or motivate them so that they believe they can do it!  

This book is dedicated to the author’s teacher who dared him to make his mark. How could you ‘make your mark’?  I could make my mark by using shapes or a line.  

Reflection: The Dot Hridaan  

Has there ever been a time when you thought that you couldn’t do something?  

Yes, when I was too scared to swing after I fell off one.  

How did you overcome it? I didn’t think about falling off.  

How can you help others when they don’t believe that they can do something?  

I can encourage them.  

This book is dedicated to the author’s teacher who dared him to make his mark. How could you ‘make your mark’? I could start by taking small steps and then become great at it.  

Reflection: The Dot Tony  

Has there ever been a time when you thought that you couldn’t do something? Yes  

How did you overcome it? I tried, tried, tried, tried and tried.  

How can you help others when they don’t believe that they can do something?  

I will ask them to try again and if that doesn’t work, ask them to do other thing they can try and do.  

This book is dedicated to the author’s teacher who dared him to make his mark. How could you ‘make your mark’? I can leave mark :try again  

Reflection: The Dot Maxence  

Has there ever been a time when you thought that you couldn’t do something?  

Yes, there has been a time.  

How did you overcome it? I overcame it by thinking that I can do it and I tried.  

How can you help others when they don’t believe that they can do something?  

You can tell them that they can figure it out if they put their mind to it.  

This book is dedicated to the author’s teacher who dared him to make his mark. How could you ‘make your mark’? I would draw a snake as my mark.  

Reflection: The Dot Oceane  

Has there ever been a time when you thought that you couldn’t do something?  

Yes. One time when I was with my sister and there was a big rock. We climbed up the rock. It was a very tall, taller than me, so we had to jump. My sister jumped like that, but I was worried, so I thought I couldn’t do it. But, there was a little girl in my mind which said you could do it, so I just jumped.  

How did you overcome it? Well, the way I overcome it is, in Khan Academy, language, Grammarly someone who’s name is David. He is the one teaching us that and for that at the end of each lesson he says, ‘you can do anything you want and David’s out’. So, that gave me passion to try.  

How can you help others when they don’t believe that they can do something?  

Well, I will show them that I can do it because then they will feel oh she can do it then I should try. If they still can’t do it then I’ll say, ‘Okay, we can try together’ and maybe they will try again. If they still can’t try or not able to do then I will try to find a solution.  

This book is dedicated to the author’s teacher who dared him to make his mark. How could you ‘make your mark’? My mark could be me because, it’s how I am called and it’s my name.  

Reflection: The Dot Advait  

Has there ever been a time when you thought that you couldn’t do something? Yes  

How did you overcome it? I told myself that I can do it and once I started I realized that it was all in my head.  

How can you help others when they don’t believe that they can do something?  

I say, if you have never done it before how do you know if it is. If they reply, it looks very scary. I say, never believe something by seeing it, you have to feel it. 

This book is dedicated to the author’s teacher who dared him to make his mark. How could you ‘make your mark’? I can make my mark by overcoming my fear of something like bugs in my case and doing something which will make me change over my fear.  

This set of questions took the main themes of the book, provided an opportunity to see how we can “unpack” a text and personalise it.  

Of course, our Early Years Learners also celebrated this day and please do take the time to read their blog also shared with you this week.   

Article complied by Ms Helen Sharrock – Primary Principal; with contributions from the P1 to P5 learners and teachers.  

Bibliography 

“Not just a dot.” Brantz, Loryn. Not Just a Dot. Sky Pony, 2014. 

“The dot.” Reynolds, Peter H. The Dot. Candlewick Press, 2003. 

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